My list of must do mods for Manual Trans Alltracks

Blip6to2

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#1
Hi Everyone, I am creating this list of mods/checks that I personally think are a must if you are generally unimpressed/unhappy with the 6 speed manual transmission performance on the Golf Alltrack. I have driven stick shift cars all my life and I found it difficult to make smooth shifts with this car and had trouble taking off from a stop on steep hills without nearly killing the engine or over-slipping the clutch. Not to mention the 1 to 2 shift being very notchy and the 2 to 3 shift somewhat notchy as well (especially in colder ambient temperatures). This list of mods/checks is what I have done to my Alltrack and have found them to make the car perform how I feel it should have from the factory. These will create a much more pleasurable driving experience as you will get much more direct throttle/clutch response and be able to effortlessly shift through the gears. I am not really going to go into detail of the "how-to" on these mods as there are already tons of info out there on the internet to perform these. But if you have any questions for me on these, please feel free to ask away! I am not sure if any of these will void the cars warranty. I do not believe they will, but I want to make sure I have stated that.

1) Direct Throttle Programming Tweak - This creates a much better throttle response and gets rid of a lot of the throttle pedal lag/delay. It doesn't make it as good as a throttle cable operated car, but it gets it pretty close. This can be made by using a vcds ross-tech cable or an OBDeleven scan tool. I personally bought and used an OBDeleven.

2) Remove the Clutch Delay Valve and Clutch Pedal Helper Spring - The clutch has an in-line delay valve that restricts the flow of the hydraulic fluid action to the slave cylinder. This is to in theory let the clutch softly engage even if you dump the clutch pedal for inexperienced or sloppy drivers. The problem with this is for experienced stick shift drivers, this really gets in the way and delays clutch action. It makes clutch engagement feel inconsistent and hard to feel the bite point in the pedal. You can also notice that the clutch slips longer than it should before fully engaging after you have fully let out the clutch pedal. The clutch line bleeder block on top of the transmission has the yellow delay valve inside of it. It is pretty easy to remove it, put everything back together and bleed out the clutch line. Removing this valve creates a much more direct traditional clutch feel. This will also allow for quicker shifts as the clutch will fully disengage faster as well. Some have said this mod should make the clutch friction disk last longer also. The clutch pedal under the dash also has a helper spring on it. This spring helps pull the pedal to the floor and compresses the most right at the end. I believe this is to try to relieve leg fatigue for times you have to hold the clutch in for extended periods of time. This is not a heavy duty clutch and is not really necessary. It creates an uneven feel to the pedal when letting out the clutch. Removing this spring makes the entire pedal travel feel consistent and smooth.

3) Install Solid Shifter Cable Bushings\Align Shifter Cables - This mod isn't quite as necessary as the others however, the shifter cable end bushings that attach to the selector on top of the transmission are engineered to flex and give. This creates a slight sloppy/rubbery feel of the shifter. Replacing these with solid bushings takes up a lot of slop and really helps the shifter feel in finding the gears. I used the Torque Solution bushings from USP motorsports but there are a few other options. It is also very important to align your shifter with the transmission selector after doing this. There are many videos on youtube that show how to do this. But if the shifter and transmission aren't perfectly aligned, it will make shifting into the gears not as easy/smooth as it should be.

4) Check Transmission Oil Level - Some have found that the factory underfilled the manual transmission on their Alltrack (myself included). This one is not an easy task to do though and it's likely your dealer will not entertain the idea of checking the fluid level due to the fact that there is no fill plug. My dealership was not interested in performing this when I complained of notchy shifting especially when cold outside. They just stated it was normal behavior and that the transmission is under warranty. I was not satisfied with this. I went ahead and ordered 3 quarts of Redline MT-LV (which has the correct fluid spec to the OE fluid) and decided to do an early change at 8,000 miles. The fluid capacity fill for the trans is 2.3L (2.43Qt). I was only able to drain 2L out of it. I filled the transmission with the correct amount (this is done by removing the selector bolt and filling through there). 1 to 2 shifts are considerably less notchy and 2 to 3 is pretty much as smooth as the rest now. Cruising through parking lots, I used to notice a lot of transmission noise in first and second gears. Now it is very quiet. I have no idea how much of this is from having the correct amount of fluid in there vs using the Redline fluid instead of OE. The Redline fluid is an ester based full synthetic so it should be just as good if not better than the OE fluid. Either way, I have a lot more peace of mind now that I know the correct amount of fluid is filled in the transmission.
 
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FooDogg

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#2
Hi Everyone, I am creating this list of mods/checks that I personally think are a must if you are generally unimpressed/unhappy with the 6 speed manual transmission performance on the Golf Alltrack. I have driven stick shift cars all my life and I found it difficult to make smooth shifts with this car and had trouble taking off from a stop on steep hills without nearly killing the engine or over-slipping the clutch. Not to mention the 1 to 2 shift being very notchy and the 2 to 3 shift somewhat notchy as well (especially in colder ambient temperatures). This list of mods/checks is what I have done to my Alltrack and have found them to make the car perform how I feel it should have from the factory. These will create a much more pleasurable driving experience as you will get much more direct throttle/clutch response and be able to effortlessly shift through the gears. I am not really going to go into detail of the "how-to" on these mods as there are already tons of info out there on the internet to perform these. But if you have any questions for me on these, please feel free to ask away! I am not sure if any of these will void the cars warranty. I do not believe they will, but I want to make sure I have stated that.

1) Direct Throttle Programming Tweak - This creates a much better throttle response and gets rid of a lot of the throttle pedal lag/delay. It doesn't make it as good as a throttle cable operated car, but it gets it pretty close. This can be made by using a vcds ross-tech cable or an OBDeleven scan tool. I personally bought and used an OBDeleven.

2) Remove the Clutch Delay Valve and Clutch Pedal Helper Spring - The clutch has an in-line delay valve that restricts the flow of the hydraulic fluid action to the slave cylinder. This is to in theory let the clutch softly engage even if you dump the clutch pedal for inexperienced or sloppy drivers. The problem with this is for experienced stick shift drivers, this really gets in the way and delays clutch action. It makes clutch engagement feel inconsistent and hard to feel the bite point in the pedal. You can also notice that the clutch slips longer than it should before fully engaging after you have fully let out the clutch pedal. The clutch line bleeder block on top of the transmission has the yellow delay valve inside of it. It is pretty easy to remove it, put everything back together and bleed out the clutch line. Removing this valve creates a much more direct traditional clutch feel. This will also allow for quicker shifts as the clutch will fully disengage faster as well. Some have said this mod should make the clutch friction disk last longer also. The clutch pedal under the dash also has a helper spring on it. This spring helps pull the pedal to the floor and compresses the most right at the end. I believe this is to try to relieve leg fatigue for times you have to hold the clutch in for extended periods of time. This is not a heavy duty clutch and is not really necessary. It creates an uneven feel to the pedal when letting out the clutch. Removing this spring makes the entire pedal travel feel consistent and smooth.

3) Install Solid Shifter Cable Bushings\Align Shifter Cables - This mod isn't quite as necessary as the others however, the shifter cable end bushings that attach to the selector on top of the transmission are engineered to flex and give. This creates a slight sloppy/rubbery feel of the shifter. Replacing these with solid bushings takes up a lot of slop and really helps the shifter feel in finding the gears. I used the Torque Solution bushings from USP motorsports but there are a few other options. It is also very important to align your shifter with the transmission selector after doing this. There are many videos on youtube that show how to do this. But if the shifter and transmission aren't perfectly aligned, it will make shifting into the gears not as easy/smooth as it should be.

4) Check Transmission Oil Level - Some have found that the factory underfilled the manual transmission on their Alltrack (myself included). This one is not an easy task to do though and it's likely your dealer will not entertain the idea of checking the fluid level due to the fact that there is no fill plug. My dealership was not interested in performing this when I complained of notchy shifting especially when cold outside. They just stated it was normal behavior and that the transmission is under warranty. I was not satisfied with this. I went ahead and ordered 3 quarts of Redline MT-LV (which has the correct fluid spec to the OE fluid) and decided to do an early change at 8,000 miles. The fluid capacity fill for the trans is 2.3L. I was only able to drain 2L out of it. I filled the transmission with the correct amount (this is done by removing the selector bolt and filling through there). 1 to 2 shifts are considerably less notchy and 2 to 3 is pretty much as smooth as the rest now. Cruising through parking lots, I used to notice a lot of transmission noise in first and second gears. Now it is very quiet. I have no idea how much of this is from having the correct amount of fluid in there vs using the Redline fluid instead of OE. The Redline fluid is an ester based full synthetic so it should be just as good if not better than the OE fluid. Either way, I have a lot more peace of mind now that I know the correct amount of fluid is filled in the transmission.
Great write up!
There are some threads on vwvortex under the Golf Sportwagon VII FORUM that touch on various issues and solutions for "notchy shifts" but none so straightforward and well explained as this.

I too was very frustrated with the ofd clutch feel and spent a lot of time trying to get used to it, having driven MT in various cars for 40 years I was fairly certain it was NOT my technique, and only after having to replace a clutch and friction pad at 29000 miles did I investgate more- just recently learning of CDV delete etc.

After another 25k on new OEM clutch I have adjusted my technique to accommodate the delayed engagement and odd feel, but it still presents a problem in uphill starts or feathering in slow speed over ruff roads, so in order to get that additional capability using "old school" clutch without the VW nanny improvements, these steps are next.

ECS Tuning sells a clutch bleeder valve that replaces the stock part, and without the restriction.

OP, Thanks again!



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
 
OP
Blip6to2

Blip6to2

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Thread Starter #3
That's a bummer to hear your first clutch only lasted 29,000 miles. I really hope to get a lot more than that out of mine. I don't plan to tune it so I hope it will. I have seen the ECS bleeder block and that would work well too. I just didn't think it was worth spending over $100 for one when the stock one can be modified so easily. Plus I liked the idea of the stock bleeder valve still being there just so it looks like I didn't modify anything if I ever do need driveline type warranty work done. I typically like to keep my cars as stock as possible, but these I really feel are a must. I went from always having to really concentrate on driving this car smoothly to now driving primarily with muscle memory and a huge smile on my face!
 

Runtrack

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2019 Golf Alltrack SE
#4
Great write up.
Now right out there I want to say I don't think my Alltrack shifts bad or horribly or any thing. However its not as consistent as my Wrangler was or any of my previous sticks for that matter. At times it feels a little funny and I'm regularly scratching my head after I shift.
"I have driven stick shift cars all my life and I found it difficult to make smooth shifts with this car"
I totally agree with this. I have had nine cars in my life, seven were manuals, and all shifted very consistently. I'm so glad to hear I'm not the only one who feels this way.
"It makes clutch engagement feel inconsistent and hard to feel the bite point in the pedal".
Also agree with this statement, a lot, but couldn't figure out what was causing it or why.
Again great write up. Thanks for sharing your knowledge/experience. I think I will be making some changes to mine in the very near future.
 
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